Aloe and Bitter Melon Can This 2 – Plant Mixture Help Reverse Diabetes

If you’ve been diagnosed with prediabetes, it’s time to get to know these natural foods! The research is steadily growing to support these 2 ingredients as fantastic blood-sugar regulators. Here’s the best way to take them and where to find them.

Bitter melon, also known as bitter gourd or karela (in India), is a unique vegetable-fruit that can be used as food or medicine.

It is the edible part of the plant Momordica Charantia, which is a vine of the Cucurbitaceae family and is considered the most bitter among all fruits and vegetables.

The plant thrives in tropical and subtropical regions, including:

  • South America
  • Asia
  • parts of Africa
  • the Caribbean

The bitter melon itself grows off the vine as a green, oblong-shaped fruit with a distinct warty exterior – though its size, texture and bitterness vary between the different regions in which it grows – and is rich in vital vitamins and minerals.

How does it affect diabetes?

In addition to being a food ingredient, bitter melon has also long been used as a herbal remedy for a range of ailments, including type 2 diabetes.

The fruit contains at least three active substances with anti-diabetic properties, including charantin, which has been confirmed to have a blood glucose-lowering effect, vicine and an insulin-like compound known as polypeptide-p.

These substances either work individually or together to help reduce blood sugar levels.

It is also known that bitter melon contains a lectin that reduces blood glucose concentrations by acting on peripheral tissues and suppressing appetite – similar to the effects of insulin in the brain.

This lectin is thought to be a major factor behind the hypoglycemic effectthat develops after eating bitter melon.

What other health benefits does it have?

Bitter melon is used in traditional medicine for:

  • Colic
  • Fever
  • Burns
  • Chronic cough
  • Painful menstruation
  • Skin conditions

It is also used to heal wounds, assist childbirth and, in parts of Africa and Asia, prevent or treat malaria and viral diseases such as measles and chicken pox.

In addition, researchers from Saint Louis University in the US say they have shown that an extract from bitter melon can kill breast cancer cells and prevent them from growing and spreading.

Availability of bitter melon

Bitter melon can be taken in several forms; it can be eaten as a fruit, made into juice, the seeds can be added to food in a powdered form, or it can be used in the form of a decoction by boiling pieces of the melon in water. Alternatively, bitter melon extract can be bought as a herbal supplement.

The fruit itself is available in Asian food stores and grocery shops, while other forms of the fruit-vegetable can be found in most health food shops.

Precautions

If you’re thinking of adding bitter melon to your diet, make sure you limit yourself to no more than two ounces of bitter melon (or more than two melons) a day, as excessive consumption can cause mild abdominal pain or diarrhoea.

If you are considering using bitter melon for glycemic control, you should consult your doctor or healthcare professional first to check that it is safe for use alongside your prescribed diabetes medication, as there is the risk that taking bitter melon together with these drugs and/or insulin could cause hypoglycemia (extremely low blood sugar).

Aloe Vera

Aloe vera is a product of the prickly but succulent aloe vera plant, which has been used in herbal medicine for thousands of years due to its healing, rejuvenating and soothing properties.

Preliminary research suggests that intake of aloe vera juice can help improve blood glucose levels andmay therefore be useful in treating people with diabetes.

Aloe has also been linked with:

  • Decreased blood lipids (fats) in patients with abnormally high levels of these molecules in the blood (e.g. some people with type 2 diabetes) and/or acute hepatitis (liver disease)
  • Decreased swelling and faster healing of wound injuries. Leg wounds and ulcers are common complications of diabetes, and they typically take longer time to heal than in healthy non-diabetic individuals.
How to Purchase Bitter Melon and Aloe for Supplementation

As bitter as bitter melon may be when you eat it out of hand, the tea is said to taste even better than green tea. It’s available at many Asian groceries. Capsule form is also widely available online. Aloe vera supplements in different forms are also available from many health food retailers. It comes in juice form as well as capsules.

Precautions in the Use of Bitter Melon and Aloe

While it speaks to the powerful compounds working in both bitter melon and aloe, keep in mind that too much may drop your blood sugar to hypoglycemic levels, associated with such symptoms as blurred vision, jitters, fatigue, headache and dizziness. Bitter melon also may cause stomach pain or diarrhea.

Aloe juice is a potent laxative (which is why it was traditionally used for constipation). Its use should also be monitored because it may interfere with the absorption of certain medications.

 

Source : https://articles.mercola.com